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Project description

Development of an Integrated Management Strategy for Root-Knot Nematode in Carrot. (99CC013)
Program UC IPM competitive research grants program
Principal
investigator
P.A. Roberts, Nematology, UC Riverside
Host/habitat Carrots
Pest Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne spp.
Discipline Nematology
Review
panel
Cultural Controls
Start year (duration)  1999 (Three Years)
Objectives Design and assess an integrated nematode management plan for carrot using host plant resistance, rotation and planting date control tactics for California fresh carrot production systems.
Final report A combination of host plant resistance, rotation and planting date control tactics for fresh carrot production was studied in field experiments to develop integrated management of root-knot nematodes. Three experimental field sites in the San Joaquin Valley were used to compare yield and quality of resistant and susceptible carrot on root-knot infested ground, following the previous cropping of resistant and susceptible cotton, tomato and cowpea, and at different planting dates. At two sites at the Kearney Agricultural Center infested with two root-knot nematode species, experimental plots were planted with resistant and susceptible tomato, and resistant cotton and cowpea rotation crops in spring and summer, 2000. Assessments were made in these plots of root-gall symptoms at harvest, and of soil population densities of root-knot before fall planting of carrot. Results indicated an effective suppression of nematode infection and population levels in resistant tomato, cowpea and cotton, depending on the nematode species. These plots were planted in September (early planting) or November (late planting) with resistant and susceptible carrot. Carrot roots were assessed for nematode damage symptoms (forking and galling) in spring, 2001. The experiment was repeated for a second year, with spring-summer 2001 planted rotation crops of cotton, tomato and cowpea, followed by fall 2001 carrot plantings that were evaluated in spring 2002. In both years in the four experiments, significant suppression of nematode root damage was achieved with late compared to early planting, with resistant compared to susceptible carrot, and with preceding resistant compared to susceptible rotation cropping. Some combinations of these tactics eliminated nematode damage, particularly those involving late-planted resistant carrot. These multiple-year experiments provide guidelines for implementation of resistant carrot varieties and for carrot production on nematode infested fields without the use of soil fumigation.

Third-year
progress
A combination of host plant resistance, rotation and planting date control tactics is being studied for fresh carrot production to develop integrated management of root-knot nematodes. Three experimental field sites in the San Joaquin Valley are being used to compare yield and quality of resistant and susceptible carrot on root-knot-infested ground, following the previous cropping of resistant and susceptible cotton, tomato and cowpea, and at different planting dates. At nematode infested sites at the Kearney Agricultural Center experimental plots were planted with resistant and susceptible tomato, and resistant cotton and cowpea in spring and summer, 2000. Assessments were made in these plots of root-gall symptoms at harvest and of soil population densities of root-knot before fall planting of carrot. Results indicated an effective suppression of nematode infection and population levels in resistant tomato, cowpea and cotton, depending on the nematode species. These plots were planted in September (early planting) or November (late planting) with resistant and susceptible carrot. Carrot roots were assessed for nematode damage symptoms (forking and galling) in spring, 2001. Significant suppression of nematode root damage was achieved with late compared to early planting, with resistant compared to susceptible carrot, and with preceding resistant compared to susceptible cropping. Some combinations of these tactics eliminated nematode damage. The experiment is being repeated, with spring-summer 2001 planted preceding crops, followed by fall 2001 carrot plantings, that will be evaluated in spring 2002. These experiments over multiple years should lead to guidelines for carrot production on nematode infested fields without the use of soil fumigation.

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