How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Frost

The flesh of tubers exposed to freezing temperatures may turn gray or reddish brown. Freezing temperatures may also cause ice crystals to form in the internal cells. Affected tissues become liquid, and the vascular ring may break down completely. Frozen tissue may dry out and become tough or chalky. Freezing injury usually occurs on one end or the side of the tuber that is closest to the soil surface, usually the bud end, and symptoms are easily seen on the tuber surface.

Solutions

Use proper planting techniques to help protect tubers from freezing temperatures. Whenever possible, harvest and store tubers before severe frost is likely.

Frozen tuber tissue
Frozen tuber tissue
Frost on foliage
Frost on foliage
Frost damaged stem
Frost damaged stem

Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California

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