How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Pest identification and confirmation—Sawflies

How to distinguish insect larvae

Foliage-feeding sawfly species
Pear sawfly
Pear sawfly
Caliroa cerasi

Pear sawfly larvae skeletonize the leaf surface of most fruit trees and occasionally other plants such as ash and hawthorn. Larvae are dark olive green and covered with slime, so they look like slugs. Adults are shiny black with dark wings.
Bristly roseslug larva
Bristly roseslug larva
Cladius difformis
Bristly roseslug adult
Bristly roseslug adult
Cladius difformis
Bristly roseslug is one of several sluglike sawflies that feed on roses. The larvae are shiny black to pale green and at maturity may have many bristlelike hairs on the body.

Conifer sawflies
Neodiprion spp.
Conifer sawflies
Neodiprion spp.

Most conifer sawfly adults are yellowish brown to black with yellowish legs. Pines are the most common hosts; arborvitae, cypress, fir, hemlock, juniper, and spruce are also fed upon. Larvae are commonly yellowish or greenish and develop dark stripes or spots as they mature.
Mining sawfly species
Galls of willow leaf gall sawfly
Galls of willow leaf gall sawfly
Pontania pacifica

Adult males are shiny black; females are dull reddish. Females insert eggs in leaves and inject fluid that causes the reddish galls. A larva develops in each gall. Larvae feed mostly on or in broadleaf plants, including alder, birch, poplar, oak, and willow.
Raspberry horntail
Raspberry horntail
Hartigla cresseni

Horntail larvae are white and cylindrical, with dark heads and a short spine on the tail end. The adults are wood wasps with long cylindrical bodies with a spine at the tip. The females are marked with bright yellow and black; the males are mostly black. Tips of young shoots damaged by horntails wilt during the spring. The tips of the cane may girdle and wilt. The cane may suffer dieback by the summer.

Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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