How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Natural enemies

Mites have many natural enemies that limit their numbers in many landscapes and gardens, especially when undisturbed by pesticide sprays. Some of the most important are the western predatory mite and Phytoseiulus species. For citrus red mite populations, Euseius tularensis is very effective. Various insects are also important predators -- the spider mite destroyer lady beetle larva and adult, Stethorus picipes; a predaceous dustywing, Conwentzia barretti; the sixspotted thrips, Scolothrips sexmaculatus; and the predatory thrips, Franklinothrips vespiforma. Various general predators include brown lacewings, green lacewings, damsel bugs, assassin bugs, bigeyed bugs, minute pirate bugs, soldier beetles, ground beetles, and spiders.

Stethorus  larva
Stethorus larva
Stethorus  adult
Stethorus adult
Dustywing larva
Dustywing larva
Dustywing adult
Dustywing adult
Sixspotted thrips
Sixspotted thrips
Predatory thrips
Predatory thrips

Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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