How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Brown rot—Monilinia spp.

Young blossom spurs and associated leaves on plants infected with Monilinia collapse to form shoot blight. Gum may exude at the base of infected flowers. Cankers on blighted twigs have tan centers with dark margins. At high humidity, gray to tan spore masses form on diseased flower parts and twig cankers. Flowers may become infected from pink bud to petal fall and are most susceptible when fully open. Stigma, anthers, and petals are all very susceptible to infection.

Life cycle

Solutions

Prompt removal and destruction of diseased plant parts prevents the buildup of brown rot inoculum and helps keep rot below damaging levels. Prune trees to allow good ventilation. Furrow irrigate or use low-angle sprinklers to avoid wetting blossoms, foliage, and fruit. Plant varieties that are least susceptible; 'Nonpareil', 'Price', and 'Solano' cultivars are less susceptible. If you have had problems in the past, applications of fungicides at pink bud stage can help avoid serious losses.

Gumming at base of infected flowers
Gumming at base of infected flowers
Blighted twigs
Blighted twigs
Infected flowers
Infected flowers

Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California

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