How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Nutrient and mineral excesses

Nutrients, salts, and pesticides can be toxic to plants if present in excess amounts or if applied incorrectly. Excess concentrations of one nutrient can reduce the availability of other nutrients.  Toxicity symptoms include leaf tip dieback, marginal leaf chlorosis, necrosis (or burn), branch dieback, and pest problems.

Identification

Solutions

Avoid nutrient disorders by preventing root disease development, providing good drainage, and using good practices during fertilization and irrigation. Make sure that herbicides don't drift over into your landscape plants.

For more information refer to the publication Abiotic Disorders of Landscape Plants.

Damage to leaf margins do to salt toxicity
Damage to leaf margins of maidenhair tree due to salt toxicity

Salt toxicity to Coast Redwood
Salt toxicity to coast redwood

Chlorotic sweet gum leaves due to alkaline soil
Chlorotic sweet gum leaves due to alkaline soil


Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California

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