Pear

Year-Round IPM Program

(Reviewed 11/12, updated 11/12)

These practices are recommended for a monitoring-based IPM program to reduce the risks of pesticides on the environment and human health.

When a pesticide application is considered, review the Pesticide Application Checklist at the bottom of this page for information on how to minimize the risks of pesticide use to water and air quality. Water quality can be impaired when pesticides drift into waterways or move off-site. Air quality can be impaired when pesticide applications release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere.

This year-round IPM program covers the major pests of pear. Track your progress through the year with the annual checklist form. Details on carrying out each practice, example monitoring forms, and information on additional pests can be found in the Pear Pest Management Guidelines.

Dormancy to delayed-dormancy

Special issues of concern related to environmental quality: dormant sprays, drift, and runoff.

Mitigate pesticide effects on air and water quality.

What should you be doing during this period?
Take beating tray samples for pear psylla adults.
Examine dormant spurs for
  • European red mite eggs
  • Pear rust mite and pearleaf blister mite
  • Pear psylla eggs if sampling in February

Manage if needed according to the Pear Pest Management Guidelines.

Also, note the presence of predatory mites.

Examine shoots for San Jose scale and pear scab lesions.

Look under bark for mealybugs.
Manage orchard floor vegetation:
  • North Coast: Eliminate weeds and ground cover before bloom in areas where frost and russeting are likely.
  • Delta: Mow resident vegetation or cover crop before bloom.
Monitor orchard temperatures and protect from frost, which can favor blossom blast.

Bloom (red bud to petal fall)

Special issues of concern related to environmental quality: drift, and runoff from rain.

Mitigate pesticide effects on air and water quality.

What should you be doing during this period?

Examine flower clusters for

  • Pear psylla eggs and nymphs
  • European red mites
  • Pear rust mites
  • Caterpillars (green fruitworm, obliquebanded leafroller)
  • Western flower thrips
  • Mealybugs (grape, obscure)
  • Western boxelder bug eggs, nymphs, and adults

Manage if needed according to the Pear Pest Management Guidelines.

Place pheromone traps in the orchard for
  • Codling moth in late March for mating-disruption and conventional orchards
  • Consperse stink bug in early April
  • Obliquebanded leafroller in late April

Check traps and keep records (example monitoring form PDF).

If using mating disruption for codling moth, place pheromone dispensers in orchard at biofix.
When weather conditions promote disease, time fungicide and antibiotic treatments as needed according to the Pear Pest Management Guidelines:
  • Pear scab
    • Check leaves and emerging fruit for pear scab lesions 7 to 10 days after an infection period to assess the effectiveness of treatment.
  • Fire blight
Watch the orchard for vertebrates and manage as necessary:
In cold, wet weather note the presence of blossom blast.

Fruit development (petal fall to harvest)

Special issues of concern related to environmental quality: runoff from irrigation and drift.

Mitigate pesticide effects on air and water quality.

What should you be doing during this period?

Take weekly samples.

Examine leaves for

  • Aphids
  • European red mites and eggs
  • Katydids or feeding damage
  • Pear psylla eggs and nymphs
  • Pear sawfly (pearslug) eggs and larvae
  • Pearleaf blister mite damage
  • Twospotted spider mites and predatory mites

Examine fruit for

  • Codling moth larva or damage
  • Katydid damage after June 30
  • Mealybugs (grape, obscure) at the calyx
  • Obliquebanded leafroller larva or damage
  • Pear rust mites at the calyx
  • Plant bug damage (western boxelder bug, lygus bugs, stink bugs)

Manage according to the Pear Pest Management Guidelines.

Continue to monitor for codling moth:
  • Continue monitoring traps.
  • Monitor fruit on the tree for damage at 800 to 900 degree-days from biofix.
  • Check fallen fruit on the ground in early July.

Manage if needed according to the Pear Pest Management Guidelines.

Check cover crops and weeds for

Manage if needed according to the Pear Pest Management Guidelines.

Continue monitoring weather conditions during rattail bloom for fire blight.
Manage orchard floor vegetation:
Note the presence of Armillaria root rot (oak root fungus).

Harvest

What should you be doing during this period?

Check fruit for damage caused by

  • Codling moth
  • Katydids
  • Mealybugs (grape, obscure)
  • Obliquebanded leafroller
  • Pear rust mite
  • Pear scab lesions (primary or secondary)
  • Pearleaf blister mite
  • Plant bugs (western boxelder bug, lygus bugs, stink bugs)
  • San Jose scale
  • New or unusual damage or pests
Continue checking codling moth traps through mid-September in mating-disruption and conventional orchards.

Postharvest

Mitigate pesticide effects on air and water quality.

What should you be doing during this period?

Check top shoots for

  • European red mite
  • Pear psylla nymphs and eggs
  • Pear rust mite
  • Pear sawfly (pearslug)
  • Pear scab lesions on leaves
  • Pearleaf blister mite damage on leaves
  • Predatory mites Webspinning spider mites
Sample fruit left on trees for codling moth and codling moth damage.

Manage orchard floor vegetation:

Pesticide application checklist

When planning for possible pesticide applications in an IPM program, review and complete this checklist to consider practices that minimize environmental and efficacy problems.

PDF: To display a PDF document, you may need to use a PDF reader.

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