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Spider Mites

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Citrus red mite

citrus red mite leaf stippling
Citrus red mite leaf stippling
Identification tip: Bleached or stippled leaves are most often caused by citrus red mite feeding. Other spider mites (family Tetranychidae) also feed on citrus so examine discolored tissue under magnification to distinguish the species causing damage.

citrus red mite fruit stippling
Citrus red mite fruit stippling
Identification tip: Stippling or silvering (on the left navel) occurs when high populations of citrus red mite feed on fruit. Twospotted mite and Yuma spider mite feeding also discolor fruit.

citrus red mite nymph and eggs
Citrus red mite nymph and eggs
Identification tip: Citrus red mite eggs are red. The mites are mostly reddish with dark mottling.
citrus red mite nymph and eggs
Citrus red mite female
Identification tip: Long, white bristles arise from bumps on the back and sides of this reddish mite.
Texas citrus mite – Top of page

Texas citrus mite damage
Texas citrus mite damage
Identification tip: Pale chlorosis or bleaching develops on the upperside of leaves where Texas citrus mites feed. Heavy feeding causes premature leaf drop, often leaving only the leaf petioles remaining on stems.

Texas citrus mite adult male and immature female
Texas citrus mite adult male (left) and immature female
Identification tip:  The male has long legs and a triangular, brownish green body with dark blotches. This immature female is about to molt into an adult. Unlike twospotted and Yuma spider mites, Texas citrus mite colonies produce little webbing.

Texas citrus mite adult male and immature female
Texas citrus mite eggs
Identification tip: Texas citrus mite eggs change from yellow when laid to reddish brown before hatching. From the top (as shown) eggs appear round. Viewed from their side, eggs are somewhat flattened or disc shaped. Unlike citrus red mite, Texas citrus mite eggs have no stalk or fibrils on top.

Texas citrus mite females and nymphs
Texas citrus mite females and nymphs
Identification tip: Females are oval, brownish green with dark blotches, and have shorter legs than males. When feeding, Texas citrus mites characteristically extend their legs straight forward and straight backward parallel to the leaf surface, and usually line up along the leaf vein.

Twospotted spider mite – Top of page
Twospotted mite damage
Twospotted spider mite damage
Identification tip: Pale yellow to brown dead patches (necrosis) can develop in leaf tissue where a colony of twospotted mites have fed.
Twospotted mite adult female and nymphs
Twospotted spider mite adult female and nymphs
Identification tip:  Twospotted spider mite can range from yellowish to green to red and usually has two irregular dark blotches on the sides of its body.

Twospotted mite eggs
Twospotted spider mite eggs
Identification tip:  The round eggs are translucent (clear and shiny) when laid, then turn opaque (whitish or milky) before hatching. Eggs often occur among, or are attached to, silk strands.

Twospotted mite webbing
Twospotted spider mite webbing
Identification tip: When twospotted mites are abundant, they produce abundant webbing that can cover leaves and fruit. The fruit rind may be bleached, pale, or discolored silverish.

Twospotted mite adult male
Twospotted spider mite adult male
Identification tip:  The twospotted mite adult male's abdomen narrows toward the rear. The male's body is smaller overall in comparison with the larger and more rounded female pictured in the photo above.

Spider mite egg (top) and a predatory mite egg
Spider mite egg (top) and a predatory mite egg
Identification tip:  Predatory mite eggs are oblong and often occur near the round eggs of their pest mite hosts.

Yuma spider mite – Top of page
Yuma spider mite damage
Yuma spider mite damage
Identification tip: Yuma spider mite feeds mostly on the underside of leaves and produces substantial silk webbing.
Yuma spider mite damage
Yuma spider mite damage
Identification tip: As with twospotted spider mite, Yuma spider mite can web both leaves and fruit. Hydrangea mite, reported only in southern California, webs fruit but not leaves. Examine the mites themselves under magnification to distinguish these species.

Yuma spider mite adults, nymphs, and eggs
Yuma spider mite adults, nymphs, and eggs
Identification tip: All stages of Yuma spider mite are typically a uniform peach color and have a shiny appearance.

 

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