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Apricot

Watch for Diseases—Fruit Development

On this page
  • Bacterial canker
  • Eutypa dieback
  • Phytophthora crown and root rot
  • Ripe fruit rot
  • Shot hole disease
  • Fog spot

Names link to more information on identification and management.

Click on photos to enlarge

Bacterial canker damage
Bacterial canker

Identification tip: If you see limb dieback, look for rough cankers and amber-colored gum. There may also be leaf spot and blast of young flowers and shoots.

Eutypa dieback
Eutypa dieback
Identification tip: Eutypa dieback, also known as Cytosporina, gummosis, and limb dieback, causes limbs or twigs to wilt and die suddenly in late spring or summer with the leaves still attached.

Apricot tree dying from phytophthora root rot
Phytophthora crown and root rot
Identification tip: Trees with Phytophthora crown and root rot develop sparse, pale foliage.

Ripe ruit rot damage
Ripe fruit rot
Identification tip: Tan spore masses form on apricots with ripe fruit rot.
Shothole disease damage.
Shot hole disease fruit and leaf lesions
Identification tip: Fruit lesions are light brown with dark purple margins and usually cluster on the fruit’s upper surfaces. Leaf spots fall out (shot hole). Shot hole disease symptoms on fruit may be confused with fog spot symptoms which consists of patches of small and large red dots on the surface of green apricots.

Fogspot
Fog spot symptoms consist of patches of small and large red dots on the surface of green apricots. Fogspot can be confused with shot hole disease symptoms.


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