2012 Highlights: UC IPM Annual Report

A new video helps growers predict when pests will be most susceptible to insecticide applications.A new video helps growers predict when pests will be most susceptible to insecticide applications.
Photos and identification tips help growers correctly identify pest problems in the field.Photos and identification tips help growers correctly identify pest problems in the field.

New tools and training for growers

New resources, including IPM programs and training videos, are helping California growers make better pest management decisions, with pistachio and cole crop growers the newest group to benefit from crop-based year-round IPM programs.

Teams of UC ANR crop production and pest management experts have described the best IPM strategies for managing these two crops’ major insect, plant disease, and weed pests in a comprehensive year-round IPM checklist, which organizes everything into one easy-to-follow timeline. When used with a crop’s pest management guidelines, growers have a detailed picture of IPM practices through the year. Year-round IPM programs are now available for 25 crops.

These and other growers now also have training videos that show how to apply these online IPM programs. One video describes the features of the programs for any crop and how they can impact pest management, while the second shows growers how to use UC IPM’s year-round IPM program to improve pest management in almonds.

Year-round IPM programs and videos are available at http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/.

Year-round IPM programs for several crops suggest the use of pest models that predict pest development. A new video demonstrates how growers can use degree-days—a unit of time and temperature—and models based on degree-days to time insecticide applications for the greatest effectiveness. Growers and pest control advisers can combine information about the numbers and life stages of certain pests they see in the field with degree-day calculations to predict when those pests will be most susceptible to pesticide control. UC IPM provides a degree-day calculator and up-to-date weather data, and the how-to video is posted on the same page.

These projects were partially funded by USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA).

> Next article: New Pest Alert series gets the word out


Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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